Page 42 - IACC Newsletter March-April 2014 Issue 03

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John McCain on why India-US partnership matters
Underlining the importance (for US) to keep India’s geopolitical interests in mind, McCain also said that the failings of US in
the Afghanistan region might “constrain India’s rise and its ability to devote resources and attention to shared foreign policy
challenges elsewhere in Asia and beyond.”
US Senator John McCain met with External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj recently. The meeting is one of two (Senator
Kerry is slated to visit India in the last week of July) ahead of Narendra Modi’s visit to the USA in September. McCain,
notably, has joined the group of legislators urging Congressional leadership to invite Modi to address a joint session of
the US Congress.
Addressing the US Senate on June 26
“I want Prime Minister Modi to succeed, because I want India to succeed. It is no secret that the past few years have been
challenging ones for India – political gridlock, a flagging economy, financial difficulties, and more. It is not my place, or that
of any other American, to tell India how to realize its full potential. That is for Indians to decide. Our concern is simply that
India does realize its full potential – for the United States has a stake in India’s success. Indeed, a strong, confident, and
future-oriented India is indispensible for a vibrant US-India strategic partnership.”
Explaining the logic of a robust India-US partnership, McCain said:
“India will soon become the world’s most populous nation. It has a young, increasingly skilled workforce that can lead India
to become one of the world’s largest economies. It is a nuclear power and possesses the world’s second-largest military,
which is becoming ever more capable and technologically sophisticated. It shares strategic interests with us on issues as
diverse and vital as defeating terrorism and extremism, strengthening a rules-based international order in Asia, securing
global energy supplies, and sustaining global economic growth.”
Arguing that India’s rise as a democratic power will be peaceful and will advance US national interests, McCain had said:
“…contrary to the old dictates of realpolitik, we seek not to limit India’s rise, but to bolster and catalyze it – economically,
geopolitically, and yes, militarily.”
Listing out the two countries’ shared interests, McCain said that since greater trade and commercial opportunity is what
Indians seem to want most from the new Government, a partnership with US can benefit both countries. Similarly,
McCain said, the modernization of India’s armed forces is something US can help with as well.
Underlining the importance (for US) to keep India’s geopolitical interests in mind, McCain also said that the failings of US
in the Afghanistan region might “constrain India’s rise and its ability to devote resources and attention to shared foreign
policy challenges elsewhere in Asia and beyond.”
“It could push India toward deeper cooperation with Russia and Iran in order to manage the threats posed by a deteriorating
Afghanistan. And it would erode India’s perception of the credibility and capability of U.S. power and America’s reliability as
a strategic partner.”
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